I have a Python script that I want to run from one console, and sometimes I want to be able to kill it from another console login (via SSH or direct to the console). To do this easily I simply wrote a bash script that uses grep and awk and then passes the results to a ‘sudo kill’ command like this:

sudo kill $(ps aux | grep 'sudo python script1.py' | awk -v i=1 -v j=2 'FNR == i {print $j}')
sudo kill $(ps aux | grep 'python script2.py' | awk -v i=1 -v j=2 'FNR == i {print $j}')
cp /var/log/security_camera.log ./

However, if you have a particularly stubborn script, you may need to use the KILL signal. To do that just specify the KILL signal like this:

sudo kill -s KILL $(ps aux | grep 'sudo python script1.py' | awk -v i=1 -v j=2 'FNR == i {print $j}')
sudo kill -s KILL $(ps aux | grep 'python script2.py' | awk -v i=1 -v j=2 'FNR == i {print $j}')
cp /var/log/security_camera.log ./

Only use the latter if you absolutely have to. There are actually a lot of signals in between the default SIGTERM signal. See:

man kill

to see the system documentation on which signals you should use when. Or just Google it. 🙂

As with most things in Linux, this is only one way to do things. But it works great for me.

This post was inspired by this Linux comic I saw on Google+ ✌  The code is all written by Leland Green (me). I take absolutely no responsibility with what you’re about to do with it!