Object Oriented Software Construction Second Edition by Bertrand Meyer

I discovered this book in 2007 while searching for references on the subject of object oriented programming. Although I knew the basics at the time and had been coding in OO languages for several years, I felt that I was doing it poorly and wanted to take my understanding to the next level. It did not take much time to realize that OOSC2 was generally regarded as one of the best, if not the BEST, book on the topic and so I happily spent an outrageous $78 for a new edition. That was exactly 9 years ago today and the book now sells for $120 brand new.

When it arrived I promptly read the first page, browsed through the chapters and set it aside with the sincere intention of reading it cover to cover “when I had more time.” Months passed, then years. I read many other books and continued to program in OO, but I could not seem to muster the motivation to tackle those 1200+ pages. One day I took a new job and brought this book to the office. One of the senior architects walked by and commented, “that’s one of the best books I’ve ever read.” I knew then that it was time. I cleared my schedule and over the course of many months, inched my way through it cover to cover.

Looking back, I would not recommend this book to anyone wishing to learn or improve their understanding of object oriented programming. Instead, I would recommend Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design. Although OOSC2 does explain all of the essential OO concepts in great detail, it reads like an academic thesis full of proofs and theorems. This is because at the time of the writing, OO was a somewhat controversial approach to software development. Meyer’s primary intention was not to make OO understandable, but to prove that OO as an end-to-end software development method was superior to all of the existing alternatives. To this end, many of the explanations and ideas are accompanied by mathematical proofs and notations which, while necessary to the progression of his arguments, only serve to frustrate those seeking to understand OO as quickly and plainly as possible.

Despite the fact that OOSC2 is not, in my opinion, the best book to learn or understand OO (although some would disagree), it is without a doubt one of the most important and influential works in the history of software engineering. As such, I recommend it highly to any person serious about software development. It is a challenging read that will add depth to your view of the craft and force you to grapple with concepts that are often taken for granted in today’s world of pervasive OO such as the superiority of single inheritance, the importance of designing by contract, the value of assertions, type checking and constrained genericity.

I thoroughly enjoyed the journey that is OOSC2 and hope you have the chance to as well!